Monday, February 23, 2009

pots.

Here are a bunch of shots of pots that I thought turned out well. There was just over 200 pieces and I really haven't had a chance to look closely at all of them. I took shots of these and didn't even get a chance to get over to the stacks of bowls and bakers, so maybe I'll post some of those later. Sorry for the mediocre photo quality, my point and shoot doesn't do so well in the barn.







Dessert plates, I took some inspiration from some kyle carpenter pots. Maybe I'll give him a cut of the net profit off these pots, watch out kc, you might have a $1.50 coming your way.


Dinner plates.


Fingerwipe mugs.


I tried to take some photos of some of the ash glazed pots but they are so dark and glossy they didn't come out. This batch of ash glaze has altered a bit over it's few months in the bucket. It's gone from a dark celadon to what now is almost a blue-black toned green.


This sat right behind an opening in the bagwall, blasted!








This is what an oxidized pot looks like, though this isn't too bad.


Here is the slip-cracking I was writing about in the previous post. I hope the photo isn't too hard to see. It's only the slip cracking, not the pot-almost as if it were crazing a bit. I noticed that it only seems to happen on pieces that are reduced more and near the bagwall. The reduction might just be a coincidence from being nearest the firebox. My theory is that since I can see white in the cracks(no salt/ash) that it must be happening in the cooling? Maybe the slip is too thick/bad fit? But why only near the firebox? Flame impingement from too early in the firing? I had about 25 pots do this, hmmmmm......
Hope you enjoy the photos. Cheers!

9 comments:

Joy Tanner said...

I used to get that same exact slip cracking in a salt/soda I used to fire. It happened especially when the slip was extra thick, and like you, closer to the bagwall and in more reduced areas. It was a helmar based slip. Now using those same slips I don't get it in the soda kiln. Are you using salt? I wonder if it has something to do with that, which doesn't really solve the problem, but I'm just guessing here. It was always a mystery to me too. I've still seen Linda get it in her salt/soda kiln, too. I hate it when that happens, but I do think it's just the slip and still usable/functional because it doesn't go all the way through the pot. It also always only happened on stoneware pieces. I always cool very slowly but back then in that salt/soda kiln it was a leaky kiln, so it could have had cool spots sucking in around the burner ports that caused this to happen since they were right near the bagwall...hmmm...

Anonymous said...

Brandon,

These are very beatiful pots. congrats! and thanks for sharing,
marcella

ang said...

stunning dinner plates, what a load you get in the new kiln, interesting about the ash glaze changing colour eh...nice work..

jbf said...

Good firing! Especially for the first one.

tsbroome said...

Beautiful as always! I'll try and post a photo of a mug I got out of the gas kiln last week, used yours as inspiration, so I guess I owe you $1.50 as well. You can send it on to Kyle!

Joe and Christy said...

Congrats on the first firing. Those certainly are strange cracks. Do they flake off if you pick at them. I assume that the slip doesn't show any signs of cracking before the firing. If they are cooling cracks could more silica in the slip help? Good thing its just some of the pots.
good luck
Joe

brandon phillips said...

thanks for the suggestions about the slip, i have some theories to try out and i'll share what i come up with.

tracey- post that pot. i'd love to see it.

Judy Shreve said...

sweet firing! those yellows are luscious!

Red Hot Pottery said...

wow!!! beautiful!! Especially LOVE those dinner plates!